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Innovation in Modern Drug Development Using Microchips

Imagine a clear chip, like a computer chip, the size of an USB stick. Now imagine these small chips can represent and simulate the basic function, organization and activities of a full-sized human organs. It sounds crazy. But microchips such as these, could have the power to modernize…

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Combatting COVID-19 with Help from Genetically Engineered Mice

While three COVID-19 vaccines are currently being administered, with the latest receiving FDA approval in late February, efforts to develop additional candidates remain in the pipeline. In the past, it has usually taken 10 to 15 years for vaccine development. This lengthy process helps ensure safety and effectiveness.

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Could Sea Sponges Wipe Out Tuberculosis?

In Brief Tuberculosis (TB) is a resilient, deadly, airborne infectious disease. It is a leading cause of death by infectious diseases worldwide. Sea sponges could hold the key to fighting this highly resistant disease by inhibiting the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that causes TB. Many Americans…

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From Insult to Injury: Pollution and the Brain

How polluted is the air you breathe? If you answered, “I don’t know,” you’re not alone. Dr. Anna Robuck, a pollution researcher at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography says “it [is] really crazy that I didn’t know about living in a polluted community until…

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CRISPR: Cutting its way across the scientific world

STORY UPDATE: In 2020, CRISPR pioneers Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for pioneering the CRISPR technology. In Brief CRISPR/Cas9 is a relatively new, multifaceted gene editing technology. Prior to the advent of this technology, other scientific tools were available to achieve…

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