Innovation in Modern Drug Development Using Microchips
Apr23

Innovation in Modern Drug Development Using Microchips

In Brief: Organ-on-a-chip technology is used to model and emulate real human organs. The chips are lined with human cells, allowing them to recreate the same mechanical stress that cells experience in the human body.  The structural similarity of these chips to real human tissues allows for drug testing in both healthy and diseased organs.  Scientists believe the technology could save time and resources for the creation of drugs in...

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How Monkeys Provide Insights into the Development of Prosthetic Limbs
Apr01

How Monkeys Provide Insights into the Development of Prosthetic Limbs

In Brief For decades, the best option for those who lost a limb through injury or disease was standard prosthetics. However, thanks to new technology, we may soon have new and better choices. Scientists are studying the motor cortex, a region of the brain responsible for movement control. They believe if we can decipher how the motor cortex sends and receives messages, we could possibly create prosthetic limbs that can be controlled...

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The Future of Prosthetics: Replacement Limbs That Mimic Real Ones
Dec15

The Future of Prosthetics: Replacement Limbs That Mimic Real Ones

In Brief Robotic prostheses can already restore some level of function, but they don’t often feel natural. Researchers at the MIT Biomechatronics Lab have been developing lower limb prostheses that feel like a natural extension of the human body. These robotic limbs use a variety of different techniques to ensure comfort as well as restoration of function to an amputee. Imagine you’re a rock climber on the icy slopes of Mount...

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Mind-Controlled Movement: Advancements in the Field of Prosthetics
Aug19

Mind-Controlled Movement: Advancements in the Field of Prosthetics

Controlling things with your mind sounds like something out of science fiction. However, research has allowed for the technological development of mind-controlled prosthetics.

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Holy Cow, Can You Hear Me Now?
Jan11

Holy Cow, Can You Hear Me Now?

Hearing loss has many causes including genetic disorders, extended exposure to dangerously loud sounds and normal aging. Hearing aids can’t repair the damage regardless of the cause. Taking a different approach that uses biology and technology, researchers at Princeton are developing a bionic ear that contains biological and electronic materials, including bovine or cow cells, silicone, and silver nanoparticles. The structure of cartilage cells from cows is similar to that of human cells, and bovine cells are much easier to obtain.

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