How Monkeys Provide Insights into the Development of Prosthetic Limbs
Apr01

How Monkeys Provide Insights into the Development of Prosthetic Limbs

In Brief For decades, the best option for those who lost a limb through injury or disease was standard prosthetics. However, thanks to new technology, we may soon have new and better choices. Scientists are studying the motor cortex, a region of the brain responsible for movement control. They believe if we can decipher how the motor cortex sends and receives messages, we could possibly create prosthetic limbs that can be controlled...

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Combatting COVID-19 with Help from Genetically Engineered Mice
Mar11

Combatting COVID-19 with Help from Genetically Engineered Mice

In Brief Genetically engineered mouse models that can react to COVID-19 the same way humans do are playing a key role in the development of vaccines. Mice have been used in biomedical research dating back to 1678, including in the annual development of influenza vaccinations. To create a genetically engineered mouse model specific to SARS-CoV-2, scientists used an adenovirus based vector that was altered to carry a specific DNA or RNA...

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Lessons from Salamanders: Could Humans Ever Regenerate Limbs?
Mar02

Lessons from Salamanders: Could Humans Ever Regenerate Limbs?

In Brief Salamanders, which have the ability to regenerate parts of their body, may one day provide the key to helping humans generate lost limbs. Scientists are studying these animals to understand precisely how the process works and how it might be applied to other species. Even if possible, there will likely be significant challenges. These include the length of time that may be required to regrow limbs and concerns about possible...

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Can Herpes Unravel the Mysteries of Alzheimer’s Disease?
Feb19

Can Herpes Unravel the Mysteries of Alzheimer’s Disease?

In Brief In recent years, researchers have confirmed a surprising link between Alzheimer’s disease and the herpes simplex virus. The finding led a team at Tufts University to create a 3-D model that mimics similar components of the human brain and shows a possible causal relationship between the herpes simplex virus and sporadic Alzheimer’s. The inventors believe the model can be used to better understand the devastating disease and...

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Could Sea Sponges Wipe Out Tuberculosis?
Jan19

Could Sea Sponges Wipe Out Tuberculosis?

In Brief Tuberculosis (TB) is a resilient, deadly, airborne infectious disease. It is a leading cause of death by infectious diseases worldwide. Sea sponges could hold the key to fighting this highly resistant disease by inhibiting the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that causes TB. Many Americans might assume COVID-19 is the only active pandemic at this time. However, they would be wrong. Tuberculosis (TB) kills...

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From Insult to Injury: Pollution and the Brain
Jan13

From Insult to Injury: Pollution and the Brain

In Brief 90% of the U.S population is exposed to high levels of air pollution. Some researchers are studying how synthetic chemicals found in common household items enter the ocean and spread throughout the food web. For example, they’ve found pollutants in tissue samples taken from seabirds. One pollutant, diesel exhaust (DE), can spread throughout internal organs, including the brain, through inhalation and circulation. The...

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