Can Our Pets Be the Answer to Our Problems?
Jun09

Can Our Pets Be the Answer to Our Problems?

In Brief Approximately 38% of adults will be diagnosed with a form of cancer at some point in their lifetimes. But humans are not the only ones affected by this disease. Nearly one in four dogs will be diagnosed with cancer as well. Dogs have been used successfully to further our understanding of cancer. Studying dogs allows scientists to substantiate hypotheses raised during rodent testing. Dog models are used as the last pathway in...

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Spina bifida and Weimaraners
Aug06

Spina bifida and Weimaraners

Spina bifida is a neural tube birth defect where the baby’s backbone and its surrounding membranes fail to properly develop. Researchers found one genetic mutation in Weimaraners that causes spina bifida, which is also present in humans, but not found in any other dog species.

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Terriers Give Insight into Glaucoma
Apr21

Terriers Give Insight into Glaucoma

Researchers using data from terriers have found an area on the canine chromosome 8 that is associated with glaucoma. This same chromosome has been associated with glaucoma in humans, providing hope that when the exact gene and mutation are identified in the terriers, they will match a similar gene and mutation in humans. Such a discovery would open the door to more effective therapies so that dogs and people could keep their precious sense of sight intact.

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Dogs Really Are Man’s Best Friend: Osteosarcoma Research in Great Danes
May20

Dogs Really Are Man’s Best Friend: Osteosarcoma Research in Great Danes

Great Danes are one of the best canine models for human cancer research because they have the highest chance of developing a malignancy in their lifetime. Compared to lab rats and mice, Great Danes are better models for human disease because they are genetically more similar. All too often, treatments that have worked in lab mice haven’t worked when we’ve taken them to human clinical trials. [The canine] model is much closer to human disease.

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Doberman Pinschers Asleep on the Job: Uncovering the Mysteries of Narcolepsy
Jan09

Doberman Pinschers Asleep on the Job: Uncovering the Mysteries of Narcolepsy

Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder caused by the brain’s inability to regulate sleep-wake cycles. Working with narcoleptic Doberman Pinschers, researchers discovered that canine narcolepsy is inherited directly from the parents and is an autosomal recessive trait, meaning both parents must pass down the mutated gene for the offspring to develop the disorder. Although there is not yet a cure for human narcolepsy the Doberman Pinscher may provide an important clue to understanding why they both fell asleep…on and off the job.

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Horses, Hounds, and Research Highlights: An Interview With Dr. Lance Perryman
Jul09

Horses, Hounds, and Research Highlights: An Interview With Dr. Lance Perryman

Basset Hounds may replace the Arabian horse model for SCID research in children. The main reason is that the Hounds have the gene defect that’s most commonly involved with SCID in children. Simply put, the defect matches up, and this is important when considering potential animal models. Besides the fact that Hounds are genetically similar to children in terms of the gene that expresses SCID, they also cost less to feed, have shorter gestation periods, and produce more offspring per year than Arabian horses.

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