Demystifying Human Behavior: Role of Primates in Understanding Mental Health
Mar04

Demystifying Human Behavior: Role of Primates in Understanding Mental Health

Human behaviors can be difficult to understand. Overly aggressive behaviors, extreme anxiety, and depression may be linked to cognitive issues that require intervention. Studying psychopathic traits in chimpanzees can potentially help us better assess mental health concerns. Read more to learn how this animal model plays an important role in research!

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African Spiny Mice Can Regrow Skin: A Model for Human Wound Healing
Feb12

African Spiny Mice Can Regrow Skin: A Model for Human Wound Healing

Can humans someday regenerate like the superhero Deadpool? Studies on tissue restoration in African spiny mice reveal the potential genetic origin for this extraordinary occurrence. With continued research in wound healing, the unappealing scars humans are subjected to may someday be replaced by rejuvenated skin. Check out the story for more details!

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A Sip of Medicine with Every Glass: Engineering Milk Cells to Deliver Drugs
Jan06

A Sip of Medicine with Every Glass: Engineering Milk Cells to Deliver Drugs

Scientists are engineering goat milk to deliver vaccines and medicines. Research in this technique appears promising, but there are ethical and financial challenges.

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Learning Language and The Zebra Finch Factor
Nov18

Learning Language and The Zebra Finch Factor

Scientists have increased their understanding of early childhood language development by studying the behavior and brain activity of zebra finches.

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The Sooty Mangabey: A Promising Primate Model for AIDS Research
Jun01

The Sooty Mangabey: A Promising Primate Model for AIDS Research

Being very genetically similar to humans, primate models that are natural hosts of viruses similar to HIV may be the key to furthering AIDS research.

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Healthy Gut, Healthy Brain… or Is It All in Your Head?
Apr23

Healthy Gut, Healthy Brain… or Is It All in Your Head?

We have trillions of bacteria living in our guts, but this isn’t a bad thing! In fact, these colonies of bacteria help stabilize our bodies. A recent study suggests that these bacteria can also help regulate behavioral disorders.

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