The Proof Is in the Prolactin: Hormone Plays a Role in Maternal Behavior of Mice
May18

The Proof Is in the Prolactin: Hormone Plays a Role in Maternal Behavior of Mice

Mother’s Day may be over, but at cSw, we’re celebrating motherhood by looking at its scientific basis. Dr. Rosie Brown and her team of scientists have found that a hormone plays a key role in the maternal behavior of mice, and the proof is in the prolactin.

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Killing Zika Virus Through T-cells
Jan26

Killing Zika Virus Through T-cells

Using killer T-cells, a researcher takes a shot at eliminating the Zika virus and Dengue fever that plague her native country of Nepal.

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Platypuses Making a Splash in Diabetes Research
Dec26

Platypuses Making a Splash in Diabetes Research

The platypus is a comical, egg-laying mammal with some strange anatomy. Dr. Briony Forbes and her team at the University of Adelaide have discovered a hormone in platypus venom that may hold the key to a long-lasting diabetes treatment.

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How Creepy-Crawly Maggots Could Someday Save Your Limb
Aug27

How Creepy-Crawly Maggots Could Someday Save Your Limb

Every 30 seconds, a lower limb is amputated somewhere in the world with 84% of these amputations caused by diabetic foot ulcers (DFU)s. To improve current treatment methods for DFUs, a team of researchers headed by Dr. Max Scott is genetically engineering maggots. These eat away at your skin to save your limbs!

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Using Algae to Manufacture a Malaria Vaccine
Aug18

Using Algae to Manufacture a Malaria Vaccine

Malaria is a deadly disease transmitted by mosquitoes carrying the plasmodium parasite. To prevent the parasite from infecting mosquitoes, researchers at the University of California- San Diego look to a special toxic substance. Despite its rarity, scientists have shown that algae can be used as a mini-factory to produce the substance in large quantities.

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Constricting Diabetes Using Python Plasma
Jun29

Constricting Diabetes Using Python Plasma

Burmese pythons and other similar reptiles can go many months between meals, longer than most other organisms. We know what you’re thinking — how?
Using hormonal secretions that could give us insight into treating diabetes.

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