Crayfish Get Anxious Too!
Feb12

Crayfish Get Anxious Too!

Humans are not the only ones to feel stress; simple creatures like crayfish also respond to stress in ways similar to humans. By running crayfish in a maze, Dr. Cattaert found that stressed crayfish tend to remain in dark areas with a higher level of blood glucose in their bodies.

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A New Breakthrough in Breast Cancer Therapy: Wasp Venom
Feb12

A New Breakthrough in Breast Cancer Therapy: Wasp Venom

Spanish scientists are using the poison in wasp venom to develop a new weapon in the battle against breast cancer. Other researchers are exploring ways to incorporate wasp venom in a new class of anticancer drugs designed to attack different parts of cancer cells at the same time.

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Talking Animals, Wild Teachers
Feb03

Talking Animals, Wild Teachers

Crows are known for their intelligence, particularly their use of tools. A recent study showed just how smart these birds are. After being trained to match items that look the same, the crows spontaneously learned to match items by similarity and difference.

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Turn Back The Clock! – Did Scientists Just Discover The New Fountain of Youth?
Dec16

Turn Back The Clock! – Did Scientists Just Discover The New Fountain of Youth?

Dr. John Ramunas and his team of scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine may have just found the microscopic Fountain of Youth by elongating telomeres, or DNA “handles,” expanding the life span of cells. The implications of this? Combatting aging, cancer, grafts, transplants, and more. Take that, Ponce de Leon.

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Who Let The Bugs Out? Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Could Stop Zika
Dec10

Who Let The Bugs Out? Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Could Stop Zika

Oxitec, a British biotech company, is combatting the spread of Zika virus, dengue fever, yellow fever and chikungunya, by reducing the mosquito population through genetic engineering. Or rather, letting the bugs limit themselves. Fewer mosquitos? Fewer diseases spread.

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Eye-Opening Research on Shut-Eye Deficiency
Dec03

Eye-Opening Research on Shut-Eye Deficiency

More than 12 million people in the U.S. stop breathing periodically at night due to a serious sleep disorder called Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Even more concerning, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine estimates that 80 to 90 percent of adults with OSA are currently undiagnosed. Rutgers-based scientist Dr. Judith Neubauer and her team are working tirelessly to solve the mysteries of OSA and develop a treatment for this potentially life-threatening condition.

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